Simulation based learning using the Anatomage Table

Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry, is the first in the South West and currently, 1 of the 16 medical schools across the UK who use the ‘cutting edge’ technology of a virtual dissection table- The Anatomage Table.

The Anatomage Table is a unique technology that presents visualisations for human anatomy education. The key feature that sets the Anatomage Table aside from other imaging systems is that it combines Anatomage’s renowned radiology software and clinical content with a screen resembling an operating table. The screen is a touch-interactive display system. The Table comes pre-installed with 3D gross body male and female contents, 3D high res regional anatomy and 3D imaging software with anatomy viewing and modelling tools. The data comes from real patient scans and cadavers, making them accurate (Anatomage, 2016).

Plymouth university does not use cadavers to teach anatomy. This was a conscious decision taken to ensure that medical students align with current medical practices, where doctors interact with patients via medical imaging or surface anatomy. The human cadavers have been replaced with the simulation based Anatomage Table. Simulation based learning is noted to have great implications on learning behaviour within clinical settings (Weller et al., 2012). The anatomy course at Plymouth University is taught using a combination of volunteer model patients, surface anatomy, medical imaging, plastic and computer-animated models to ensure students have a thorough understanding of the 3D nature of anatomy.

References

Anatomage (2016) The Anatomage Table (Internet) Available from http://www.anatomage.com/medical-products/anatomage-table. Last Accessed: 6th October, 2016

Plymouth University (2016) Virtual dissection table a first for Plymouth medical and dental school(Interne)

Available from https://www.plymouth.ac.uk/news/virtual-dissection-table-a-first-for-plymouth-medical-and-dental-school-schools. Last Accessed: 6th October, 2016

Weller et al. (2012) Simulation in clinical teaching and learning. The Medical Journal of Australia. Vol. 196, No. 9

 

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